What I Think of Mr. Albert: Experiences of Johnson in the Classroom, as Told by Your Students

Ruth Clemens

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    This essay examines how the inclusion of texts by B.S. Johnson on undergraduate literature modules at the University of Salford helped to further students' understanding of key concepts such as postmodernism, materiality, experimentalism, and the avant-garde. After informally interviewing recent graduates of English Literature regarding their relatively uncommon encounters with Johnson's writing as core reading on core modules, it becomes apparent that the inclusion of Christie Malry's Own Double-Entry (1973), The Unfortunates (1969), and Albert Angelo (1964) on the syllabus is useful for educators and their students. These texts ultimately help to illustrate the interactivity of the book form in the digital age, provide seminar leaders with opportunities for group study activities, and show students of higher education that engaging and popular experimental British fiction exists, albeit outside of the American-dominated canon.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)154-163
    JournalBSJ: The B.S. Johnson Journal
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

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