Trauma-induced dissociation and the psychological effects of the "troubles" in Northern Ireland: an overview and integration

Martin J. Dorahy, Christopher Alan Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During episodes of direct or indirect exposure to traumatic events, a psychological defence mechanism is believed to operate to minimise the integration of aversive stimuli with consciousness.This mechanism, known as dissociation, has received increasing theoretical and research attention in both the clinical and non-clinical population over the last 15 years. The relationship between dissociation and traumatic experience may be of significant interest in Northern Ireland considering it has been the site of social and political turmoil since the late 1960's. Yet, no studies have examined dissociation in Northern Ireland. The present aim is to integrate the literature on dissociation and the psychological effects of the "Troubles" in Northern Ireland, in an attempt to facilitate both research fields. It is argued that the study of dissociation in Northern Ireland may offer a better understanding of dissociative processes and functioning. Furthermore, it may provide another means of examining the mental health consequences of exposure to political violence.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)332-344
Number of pages13
JournalIrish Journal of Psychology
Volume19
Issue number2-3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1998
Externally publishedYes

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