Religious orientation, religious coping and happiness among UK adults

Christopher Alan Lewis, John Maltby, Liz Day

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

96 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been demonstrated that the relationship between religiosity and happiness varies according to the precise measures used and the samples studied. To examine further the generalisability of this association the present work examined the relationship between religiosity and happiness within the context of the distinction between subjective and psychological well-being. One hundred and thirty eight UK adults completed two measures of both religiosity (the 'Age Universal' Religious Orientation Scale [Intrinsic and Extrinsic subscales] and the Religious Coping Scale [Positive and Negative subscales]) and happiness (the Depression-Happiness Scale and the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire Short-Form). In general, no significant associations were found between religiosity scores and happiness scores. However, both higher intrinsic orientation scores and positive religious coping were significantly associated with higher scores on the Oxford Happiness Questionnaire Short-Form. It is proposed that these differential findings are consistent with the theoretical distinction between subjective and psychological well-being. It is suggested that when religiosity is related to happiness, it is related to psychological well-being, which is thought to reflect human development, positive functioning and existential life challenges.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1193-1202
Number of pages10
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume38
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Happiness
  • Religiosity
  • Religious coping
  • Religious orientation
  • Well-being

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