Religiosity and Healthy Lifestyle Behaviours in Malaysian Muslims: The Mediating Role of Subjective Well-Being and Self-Regulation

S.E. Tey, M.S.-A. Park, K.J. Golden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Past research on healthy lifestyle behaviours has been primarily conducted within Western or Judeo–Christian contexts, while non-Western or Muslim contexts remain under-represented. This study examined predictors of healthy lifestyle behaviours (religiosity, goal-setting, impulse control, and subjective well-being) in Malaysian Muslims and explored the mechanisms underlying the relationship between religiosity and healthy lifestyle behaviours. Self-report survey responses from 183 healthy adults (Mage = 28.63 years, 18–50 years) were analysed using regression and multiple mediation analyses. The results indicated that subjective well-being emerged as the strongest predictor, followed by goal-setting. Furthermore, subjective well-being and goal-setting mediated the religiosity–healthy lifestyle behaviour relationship. The findings provide guidance for future health-promoting interventions. © 2017 Springer Science+Business Media New York
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Religion and Health
Early online date24 Jun 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • autoregulation
  • female
  • healthy lifestyle
  • human
  • major clinical study
  • male
  • Muslim
  • self report
  • wellbeing

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