Measuring food preference and reward: application and cross-cultural adaptation of the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire in human experimental research

Pauline Oustric, David Thivel, Michelle Dalton, Kristine Beaulieu, Catherine Gibbons, Mark Hopkins, John Blundell, Graham Finlayson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    32 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Decisions about what we eat play a central role in human appetite and energy balance. Measuring food reward and its underlying components of implicit motivation (wanting) and explicit sensory pleasure (liking) is therefore important in understanding which foods are preferred in a given context and at a given moment in time. Among the different methods used to measure food reward, the Leeds Food Preference Questionnaire (LFPQ) is a well-established tool that has been widely used in the scientific field for over 10 years. The original LFPQ measures explicit liking and implicit wanting for the same visual food stimuli varying along two nutritional dimensions: fat (high or low) and taste (sweet or savoury/non-sweet). With increasing use of the LFPQ (in original or adapted forms) across different cultural and scientific contexts, there is a need for a set of recommendations for effective execution as well as cultural and nutritional adaptations of the tool. This paper aims to describe the current status of the LFPQ for researchers new to the methodology, and to provide standards of good practice that can be adopted for its cultural adaptation and use in the laboratory or clinic. This paper details procedures for the creation and validation of appropriate food stimuli; implementation of the tool for sensitive measures of food reward; and interpretation of the main end-points of the LFPQ. Following these steps will facilitate comparisons of findings between studies and lead to a better understanding of the role of food reward in human eating behaviour.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number103824
    JournalFood Quality and Preference
    Volume80
    Early online date11 Oct 2019
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2020

    Keywords

    • Food reward
    • LFPQ
    • Liking
    • Protocol
    • Standard operating procedure
    • Wanting

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