Income and social rank influence UK children's behavioral problems: a longitudinal analysis

Elisabeth A. Garratt, Tarani Chandola, Kingsley Purdam, Alex M. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Children living in low-income households face elevated risks of behavioral problems, but the impact of absolute and relative income to this risk remains unexplored. Using the U.K. Millennium Cohort Study data, longitudinal associations between Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire scores and absolute household income, distance from the regional median and mean income, and regional income rank were examined in 3- to 12-year-olds (n = 16,532). Higher absolute household incomes were associated with lower behavioral problems, while higher income rank was associated with lower behavioral problems only at the highest absolute incomes. Higher absolute household incomes were associated with lower behavioral problems among children in working households, indicating compounding effects of income and socioeconomic advantages. Both absolute and relative incomes therefore appear to influence behavioral problems.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1302-1320
Number of pages19
JournalChild Development
Volume88
Issue number4
Early online date31 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017
Externally publishedYes

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