I think it's absolutely exorbitant!": How UK television news reported the shareholder vote on executive remuneration at Barclays in 2012.

Richard Thomas

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The most publicised rebellion during the so-called ‘Shareholder Spring’ of 2012 was at Barclays PLC. Using multi-modal and critical discourse analysis, this paper examines how three UK television channels with different public service obligations covered this story on 27 April 2012. It finds that broadcasters’ regulatory obligations do not obviously impact content and that, for example, simple reporting routines contain judgemental phrases. Generally, the multi-dimensional nature of executive pay is simplified and the real balance between private and individual shareholders is obscured. Analysis also reveals that editing and the use of images can subtly construct discourses that may not reflect the reality of the dissent. The paper concludes that established criticisms that business journalism is indolent and that corporate discourses are privileged are not supported, but also that the coverage contributes little to promote wider understanding of executive pay debates.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)94-117
    JournalCritical Discourse Studies
    Volume13
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2015

    Keywords

    • Critical discourse analysis
    • executive remuneration
    • political economy
    • public service obligations
    • shareholders

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