Hedonics of food consumption: are food ‘liking’ and ‘wanting’ viable targets for appetite control in the obese?

Graham Finlayson, Michelle Dalton

    Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

    61 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In an environment where energy-dense and highly palatable foods are ubiquitous, it seems plausible that the hedonic system of appetite control will play a primary role in eating behavior—undermining homeostatic processes and driving consumption beyond energy requirements. A relevant issue in the hedonics of food consumption is the distinction between “liking” and “wanting” components of food reward. Separate neural pathways exist to mediate these processes, and experimental behavioral methods have been developed to distinguish and to measure them separately in humans. We examine the evidence that “liking” and “wanting” are involved in weight gain, obesity, and certain forms of disordered eating. Then it is questioned whether “liking” and “wanting” are involved in “food addiction.” We conclude that elevated “liking” and “wanting” are psychological markers of a susceptible phenotype for overconsumption. These processes contribute to what can be termed “hedonically driven eating” and represent viable targets for appetite control.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)42-49
    JournalCurrent Obesity Reports
    Volume1
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

    Fingerprint

    Dive into the research topics of 'Hedonics of food consumption: are food ‘liking’ and ‘wanting’ viable targets for appetite control in the obese?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

    Cite this