Differences in accelerometer measured patterns of physical activity and sleep/rest between ethnic groups and age: an analysis of UK Biobank

Nathan Dawkins, Tom Yates, Cameron Razieh, Charlotte Edwardson, Ben Maylor, Francesco Zaccardi, Kamlesh Khunti, Alex Rowlands

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Abstract

Background: Physical activity and sleep are important for health; whether device-measured physical activity and sleep differ by ethnicity is unclear. This study aimed to compare physical activity and sleep/rest in White, South Asian (SA) and Black adults by age.

Methods: Physical activity and sleep/rest quality were assessed using accelerometer data from UK Biobank. Linear regressions, stratified by sex, were used to analyse differences in activity and sleep/rest. An ethnicity*age-group interaction term was used to assess whether ethnic differences were consistent across age-groups.

Results: Data from 95,914 participants, aged 45-79 years, were included. Overall activity was 7% higher in Black, and 5% lower in SA individuals compared to White individuals. Minority ethnic groups had poorer sleep/rest quality. Lower physical activity and poorer sleep quality occurred at a later age in Black and SA adults (>65 years), than White adults (>55 years).

Conclusions: While Black adults are more active, and SA adults less active, than White adults, the age-related reduction appears to be delayed in Black and SA adults. Sleep/rest quality is poorer in Black and SA adults than in White adults. Understanding ethnic differences in physical activity and rest differ may provide insight into chronic conditions with differing prevalence across ethnicities.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Physical Activity and Health
Publication statusPublished - 26 Nov 2021
Externally publishedYes

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