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Men and women with psychosis and the impact of illness-duration on sex-differences: The second Australian national survey of psychosis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • Mary-Claire Hanlon
  • Linda E Campbell
  • Natalie Single
  • Clare Coleman
  • Vera A Morgan
  • Susan M Cotton
  • Helen J Stain
  • David J Castle
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)130-143
JournalPsychiatry Research
Volume256
Early online date13 Jun 2017
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Oct 2017

We aimed to examine and compare sex-differences in people receiving treatment for psychotic illnesses in community settings, based on long or short duration of illness; expecting association between longer illness-duration and worse outcomes in women and men. Clinical, demographic and service-use data from the Survey of High Impact Psychosis were analysed by sex and duration of illness (≤5 years; ≥6 years), using independent t-tests, chi-square tests, one-way ANOVA, and Cramer's V. Of the 1825 participants, 47% had schizophrenia, 17.5% bipolar and 16.1% schizo-affective disorders. More women than men had undertaken post-school education, maintained relationships, and been living in their own homes. Women with a shorter-illness-duration showed social functioning equivalent to non-ill women in the general population. Men tended to have an early illness onset, show premorbid dysfunction, be single, show severe disability, and to use illicit substances. Men with a longer-illness-duration were very socially disadvantaged and isolated, often experiencing homelessness and substance use. Men with a short-illness-duration were most likely to be in paid employment, but two-thirds earned less than $AUD500 per fortnight. Men with longer-illness-duration showed most disability, socially and globally. Interventions should be guided by diagnosis, but also by a person's sex and duration of illness.

    Research areas

  • Gender differences, human, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, duration of illness

Related faculties, schools or groups

External organisations

  • The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, NSW, Australia; Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia. Electronic address: Mary-Claire.Hanlon@uon.edu.au.
  • The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; Hunter Medical Research Institute, New Lambton Heights, NSW, Australia; Priority Research Centre GrowUpWell and the School of Psychology, University of Newcastle, Australia.
  • Centacare Bathurst, NSW, Australia.
  • University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia.
  • School of Psychiatry & Clinical Neurosciences, University of Western Australia, WA, Australia; North Metropolitan Health Service Mental Health, Perth, WA, Australia.
  • Centre for Youth Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
  • Priority Research Centre for Brain and Mental Health, The University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW, Australia; School of Social and Health Sciences, Leeds Trinity University, Horsforth, Leeds, UK.
  • St. Vincent's Hospital Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

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